Microelectronics | 4Mx9 70ns 30-pin SIMM

Synopsis

The 32-bit 80386DX ISA Single Board Microcomputer uses memory under the form of SIMMs. While I do have some very nice IBM 1 Mb SIMMs, I thought about designing a 4 Mb SIMM board so that I could use the full 32 Mb that my 386 computer supports. This amount of memory would've been overkill back in the early 1990s. And for an 80386 class machine, it is even now. But I always wanted to have enough space for a nice and fast RAM drive and still be able to run Windows 95 and all of my MS-DOS games without fiddling with the settings in CONFIG.SYS all the time.

Here are the hardware specifications.

  • 4 Mb 70ns single in-line memory module (SIMM) with 30-pin interface
  • Minimal number of integrated circuits
  • Parity support

Let's see what is the main motivation to design and build these memory modules. In 1996 or so I wanted to play this game called Aladdin. My 80386SX / 25 MHz machine was equipped with 2 Mb of RAM. The game required 4 Mb split between XMS and EMS. If you played that game without a XMS driver (HIMEM.SYS) installed, I bet you remember that annoying error message XMS allocation error... And it was the same case if you didn't have and EMS driver (EMM386.EXE) loaded. But in that case, the message said: EMS allocation error... Annoying as crap. Then there was Windows 95 which required 4 Mb of RAM to install and load correctly. Thus I managed to source two more 1 Mb 30-pin SIMMs. Since that computer had only four SIMM slots, I filled all of them. I don't have to remember that if I dared to use SmartDrive (SMARTDRV.SYS), the available RAM would drop down quickly. Occasionally I was using a RAM drive for my software development routines. It was drastically reducing compilation time but it was eating about 1 Mb of RAM. So it was only natural that I had multiple CONFIG.SYS configurations. While it was (partly) fun, it was also (damn) annoying at times.

Of course, these days I can buy any SIMM from eBay. But there is a catch. 4 Mb 30-pin SIMMs are incredibly scarce and expensive. But 72-pin SIMMs are very common. And this idea of robbing a 72-pin SIMM of valuable DRAM integrated circuits became a reality. Thus I bought two 16 Mb 72-pin SIMMs and carefully removed the ICs. I studied their datasheets and decided that producing a working schematic would be straightforward.

It took me two whole days to design this SIMM from start to end. As always, I routed every circuit trace manually. Initially I tried to use the autorouter. But it did a big mess. It's also true that I use a very old program to design the layouts of my printed circuit boards. I had a lot of fun designing this memory module and I felt like I was doing some kind of technological breakthrough. Of course this is a wrong perception as there's nothing science-fiction in a three integrated circuit board. But the fact that I knew the prices of RAM back in the 1990s, and the scarcity of 4 Mb modules, enabled me to keep up my euphoric mood.

Let's get started.

This project is in its final stage.
Current iteration of ASSY. 2486-SIMM-430 is VER. 1.2 REV. A
Initially I will produce 16 prototype PCBs.

* * *

Laudatur ab his, culpatur ab illis. This project is provided as-is and is not for commercial purposes. It reflects my experimental work in microcomputer system design and should be treated as such. I release the schematic and circuit boards to the public for educational purposes. I did all this on my expense and in my free time. So if you like my work, please consider a donation.

Schematics

Fig. 1: Electrical Principial Schematic

Printed Circuit Boards

Fig. 2: Top Silkscreen

Fig. 3: Bottom Silkscreen

Fig. 4: Top Layer Printed Circuit Board

Fig. 5: Inner Bottom Layer Printed Circuit Board

Fig. 6: Inner Top Layer Printed Circuit Board

Fig. 7: Bottom Layer Printed Circuit Board

Fig. 8: Top Layer Printed Circuit Board - Simulation

Fig. 9: Bottom Layer Printed Circuit Board - Simulation

Bill of Materials (BOM)

The following list contains the parts that are required to assemble one SIMM.

4Mx9 70ns 30-pin SIMM
IdentifierValueQtyNotesMouser Number
Printed Circuit BoardASSY. 2486-SIMM-4301VER. 1.2 REV. AOrder from OSHPark
IC1M5117400A-70SJ24Mx4 DRAMOrder from eBay
IC2M514100C-70SJ14Mx1 DRAMOrder from eBay
C1-C4220 nF / 16 V4MLCC80-C1206C224K4R

Assembly Instructions and Notes

Here is a list of things you need to pay attention to should you decide to build such SIMM board.

  • Inspect the printed circuit board once you receive it. Normally OSHPark produces very good quality boards but one never knows. There must be absolutely no short circuits on the printed tracks. If the PCB is faulty then it can damage the DRAM controller in the system.
  • Take your time to solder all the components on the board. If you don't have experience in hand-soldering of SOJ SMD packages, then this project might not be for you.
  • Use a temperature-controlled soldering station and quality solder. Take care not to leave solder bridges as any short circuit will most likely lead to failures.
  • In order to ease-up the PCB assembly, I would suggest mounting parts in the following order: MLCC capacitors, integrated circuits.
  • At the end, clean any flux residues with isopropyl alcohol.

Interface Connector Description

Following is described the interface connector and its respective pinout.

INTERFACE CONNECTOR DESCRIPTION
IdentifierValueNotesPinout
CON130-pin SIMM Interface1 - VDD
2 - /CAS
3 - D0
4 - A0
5 - A1
6 - D1
7 - A2
8 - A3
9 - VSS
10 - D2
11 - A4
12 - A5
13 - D3
14 - A6
15 - A7
16 - D4
17 - A8
18 - A9
19 - A10
20 - D5
21 - /WE
22 - VSS
23 - D6
24 - A11 (NC)
25 - D7
26 - P (Data Parity Out)
27 - /RAS
28 - /CASP (Parity CAS)
29 - D (Data Parity In)
30 - VDD

Construction and Pictures

While I'm waiting for the PCBs to arrive from the Factory, I sourced the required DRAM chips from the two 72-pin SIMMs that I was talking about in the introduction to this project. Here are the two 72-pin PCB assemblies. They sure do look nice.

Well, not for long. Because they're taking a hot trip in the ... bread toaster. That's my preferred way of quickly and controlled removal of SMD parts. Timing needs to be perfect or else, the ICs turn themselves into toasted ICs.

One or two minutes later, I carefully removed the PCB assembly from the toaster and quickly gave each IC a push with a small screwdriver. They fall down just like autumn leaves.

Next comes the long and boring job of cleaning the pins of old solder. I'm using solder wick and plenty of activated rosin. This leaves a very big brown mess. But the solder is all gone. To remove the rosin residues, I'm using non diluted acetone and cotton swabs. Needless to say that acetone fumes can quickly give dizziness. Thus I'm doing this operation in the open air. In addition, these fumes are extremely flammable. So extra care should be taken. But anyway, all pins are clean now.

The ICs look brand new, just as if they were never soldered before. The ones with less pins on the right side are 4Mx1 while the other ones on the left side are 4Mx4. In total 32 Mb of RAM. This amount of RAM would've cost a small fortune back in the 80386 days. Now they value as much as pocket money.

Needless to say that these ICs are very sensitive to electrostatic discharge (ESD). Thus they require careful handling at any time.

Now back to the waiting game.

TO BE CONTINUED SOON At the moment I am waiting for the PCB to arrive from the Factory.


Copyright © 2004- Alexandru Groza
All rights reserved.
VER. 1.0 | REV. A